Procedure for reporting cycling related incidents to the South Yorkshire Police.

A fuller explanation of this advice is below this “print, cut and out and keep” advice.

CycleSheffield advises members to take out personal 3rd Party liability insurance.

CycleSheffield members can get this by affiliating to the CTC (and get other services as well) for £16 p.a. This is a very inexpensive insurance policy.

Contact membership@cyclesheffield.org.uk if you want to do this.

You may wish to become a member of the CTC as well, join at www.ctc.org.uk

Procedure for reporting an incident not involving injury (101)

As soon as possible after an incident

  • Note the registration, make, model, colour of the vehicle
  • Note a description of who was driving it.
  • Get the details of independent witnesses.

As soon as you can describe the incident and write it down.

  • When did it happen?
  • Where did it happen?
  • Who was involved?
  • What happened?
  • How were you affected or put at risk?

Call 101 and state you wish to make a formal complaint about driving that you thought was anti-social, or careless, or dangerous and has put you at significant risk.

  • It is essential to get an incident number
  • Do retain the record you made at the time.
  • The police will make an appt to interview you and take a statement, either at a police station or at your home.
  • Witnesses may make a statement but not in your presence or other witnesses.
  • The PO should contact you at a later date to tell what action has been taken.

CycleSheffield October 2013

 

Procedure for reporting cycling related incidents to the South Yorkshire Police.

An ‘Incident ‘ is a situation where another road user has put you at significant risk, the gravity of which you judge warrants you making a report to the Police, with a view to the driver subsequently being subject to their attention.

This attention could be anything from an advisory  phone call, through to a prosecution (e.g. for careless/dangerous driving).  Often just a phone call has a deterrent effect.  (Prosecution is unlikely if the evidence is solely one person’s word versus another – see advice about independent witnesses below).

Another purpose of reporting is to get incidents logged so that the information they contain progress to inform future policing, transport planning/maintenance etc.

Procedure for reporting an incident

As soon as possible after an incident (ie within mins ideally, maybe by sending yourself/other a text, which will have the time on)

  • Note the registration of the vehicle and its make, model, colour.  Nothing much can be done without a reg plate number.  If the incident involves a taxi then the taxi licence plate number can be used.
  • If you can note a description of who was driving it.
  • If you can get the details of independent witnesses. The advice is they are worth their weight in gold. If an incident occurs, most will be witnessed by somebody, e.g. approach people stood at the bus stop, by the side of the road etc. and simply ask them if they’d help. Most people would if asked, the same people who would happily walk on past if not approached directly. A name and a phone number to pass to the police would be very helpful. If they refuse, so be it, but most people will help if asked (believe it or not). Scribble down a car’s number plate if it was obvious the occupants saw what happened, the police may be able to trace them and ask them if they’d like to help.

As soon as you can describe the incident and write it down.

  •  When did it happen?
  • Where did it happen?
  • Who was involved?
  • What happened?
  • How were you affected?

Then call 101 and state you wish to make a formal complaint about driving that you thought was anti-social, or careless, or dangerous and has put you at significant risk.

If asked ‘What do you want to be done about it?’ or ‘What do you expect me to do about it?’

then the reply is to repeat

‘I want to make a formal complaint and for you, the Police, to take the appropriate action please…’

It is essential to get an incident number (a number followed by the date of the report)

Do retain the record you made at the time – this is very important as more weight is given to this rather than later info/recollections.

By stating the request in this manner, you should trigger a process whereby the police will make an appt to interview you/take a statement.

If you go to a police station to make a statement then there is no reason why a friend/colleague cannot accompany you whilst you make the statement but they cannot be a witness to the incident. Witnesses may make a statement but again not in the presence of the complainant or other witnesses.

You may take your written statement to submit and as a prompt for you talk through with the PO taking the statement.

After the statement has been taken the PO will more than likely seek advice from colleagues as to what course of action to take and should contact you to tell what action has been taken.

More serious incidents

Your bike is damaged or you have damaged a vehicle

If you have been in a collision and there is damage to you or your bike then record reg plate, make & model of vehicle.

If the driver has stopped then get her/his insurance details.

A driver may want to counterclaim against you if you have damaged their vehicle and you are obliged to give your name and address and your insurance details.

Get the details of any witnesses.

If this is an incident where you think the driving was at fault then ring 101 and follow the procedure for reporting an incident above.

If you’ve been physically hurt or injured (999)

If you have been in a collision and you are hurt or injured then ring 999 (if you can).

Get witness details if you can.

Record vehicle reg plate, make, model, description of driver if they have driven away.

 

If a driver has hit or manhandled you (e.g road rage) then ring 999 and record as much detail as you can as quickly as you can – see advice above

 

SYP have a website which details the service standards you should expect and the advice on reporting incidents, however trivial

http://www.southyorks.police.uk/

 

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